End-Diastolic Pressure

[Clinical Art][Circulation] Interpretation of Hemodynamic Waveforms

October 20, 2016 Cardiology, Critical Care, EKG/ECG, Hemodynamics, Mechanical Ventilation No comments , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1st_ceb_insigniaBasic Knowledge

Mechanism of Hemodynamic Monitoring

The rapidly occurring events (represent mechanical forces) of cardiac chambers and vessels during cardaic cycle require conversion to an electrical signal to be transmitted and subsequently translated into an interpretable, graphic format. The pressure transducer is the essential component that translates the mechanical forces to electrical signals. The transducer may be located at the tip of the catheter (micromanometer) within the chamber or, more commonly, the pressure transducer is outside of the body, and a pressure waveform is transmitted from the catheter tip to the transducer through a column of fluid. These transducers consist of a diaphragm or membrane attached to a strain-gauge-Wheatstone bridge arrangement. When a fluid wave strikes the diaphragm, an electrical current is generated with a magnitude dependent on the strength of the force that deflects the membrane. The output current is amplified and displayed as pressure versus time.


Clinical Art

Pre-operations Before Recording

Old generations of transducers required calibration against a mercury manometer; fortunately, the factory-calibrated, disposable, fluid-filled transducers in clinical use today no longer need this. Table-mounted transducers do require balancing or "zeroing," which refers to the establishment of a reference point for subsequent pressure measurements. The reference or "zero" position should be determined before any measurements are made. By convention, it is defined at the patient's midchest in the anteroposterior dimension at the level of the sternal angle of Louis (fourth intercostal space). This site is an estimation of the location of the right atrium and is also known as the phlebostatic axis. A table-mounted transducer is placed at this level and the stopcock is opened to air (atmospheric pressure) and set to zero by the hemodynamic system. The system is now ready for presure measurements. It is important to emphasize that the pre-operation of the hemodynamic monitor is very important, because if the "zero" level is not properly set and the transducer not appropriately balanced, the hemodynamic data recorded would be misleading, even fatal.

Interpretation of pressure waveforms requires a consistent and systematic approach in Table 2-1. Careful scrutiny of the waveform ensures a high-fidelity recording without over- or under-damping. Each pressure event should be timed with EKG.

Table 2-1 A Systematic Approach to Hemodynamic Interpretation
1.Establish the zero level and balance transducer
2.Confirm the scale of the recording
3.Collect hemodynamics in a systematic method using established protocols
4.Critically assess the pressure waveforms for proper fidelity
5.Carefully time pressure events with the EKG
6.Review the tracings for common artifacts

At present, in the clinical setting, 3 pressure waveforms can be obtained at bedside with invasive hemodynaic monitoring devices (central venous cathether/CVC and pulmonary artery catheter/PAC), including right atrial pressure/Prapulmonary artery pressure/Ppa, and pulmonary artery wedge pressure/Ppw. The pressurewave form is recorded along with a synchronized EKG.

Normal Pressure Waveform

Atrial Pressure

The goal of measuring the atrial pressure is to measure the pressure in the ventricles  at the end of diastole, to idenfify a "filling pressure". The goal for any atrial pressure measurement is to obtain the measurement at the every end of diastole, when the atrial pressure is closest to the ventricular pressure. The normal Pra is 2-8 mm Hg and is characterized by a and v waves and x and y descents. The causes of a, v waves and x, y descents are listed below.

PS: The Rationale Reason for the Formation of Pra waveform

a wave represents the pressure rise within the right atrium due to atrial contraction follows the P wave on the EKG by about 80 msec
descet represents the pressure decay following the a wave and reflect both atrial relaxation and the sudden downward motion of the atrioventricular junction that occurs because of early ventricular systole  
c wave is sometimes observed after the a wave and is due to the sudden motion of the tricuspid annulus toward the right atrium at the onset of ventricular systole the c wave follows the a wave by the same time as the PR interval on the EKG
v wave when the tricuspid valve is closed, the pressure rise responsible for the v wave is due to passive venous filling of the atrium, represent atrial diastole. the peak of the right atrial v wave corresponds with the end of T wave on the surface EKG; the ORS alawys appears before the v wave is produced
y wave is due to rapid emptying of the right atrium when the tricuspid valve opens  

Atrial waveform interpretation in detail

v wave

The atrial pressures initially increase during systole as the contracting ventricles return blood to the atria, refilling the upper chambers. This rise in the atrial pressure is identified as the "v" wave. The upstroke of the v wave is the rise in atrial pressure as a result of atrial filling. Because it is produced as a result of ventricular contraction, its location is relative to the QRS on the EKG. Ejection eventually leads to the return of blood to the atria (left ventricular contraction refills the right atrium and produces the right atrial v wave; right ventricular contraction refills the left atrium and produces the left atrial v wave). Thus, the QRS causes the v wave, however, the QRS always appears before the v wave is produced.

PA

The normal pulmonary artery systolic pressure/Ppas is 15-30 mm Hg, the normal diastolic pressure/Ppad is 4-12 mm Hg, and the mean 9-18 mm Hg. The components pulmonary artery pressure include a rapid rise in pressure, systolic peak, a pressure decay associated with a well-defined dicrotic notch from pulmonic valve closure, and a diastolci trough.

PA and arterial pressure waveforms have similar morphology. Systole begins with the opening of the pulmonic valves. Prior to opening of the pulmonary valve, the pulmonary artery pressure is very low (the pulmonary vascular system does not need a high pressure system to perfuse). As the ventricles contact, they eject blood into the pulmonary artery. This causes an immediate rise in the arterial pressure. As blood enters the great vessels, the pressure rise quickly and steadily, producing a steep vertical rise. Late in systole, the rate of ejection slows as the pressure gradient between the right ventricle and pulmonary artery narrows. Although blood is still moving from the ventricle to the great vessels, the rate of movement is slowed to the point where the pressure begins to decline. This cause the early downslope in the arterial tracing that represents this period of reduced ejection. Like the right atrial v wave, the pulmonary artery systolic wave typically coincides with the T wave of the EKG.

Later, the ventricle begins to relax, causing the ventricular pressure to drop below the pressure in great vessels. This causes the pulmonic valves to close, producing a small rise in the PA pressure, known as the dicrotic notch. Following closure of the semi-lunar valves, the pulmonary artery continues to fall as blood leaves the great vessels to perfuse the tissues and lungs.

PAWP

The normal mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure/Ppw is obtained when the inflated catheter obstructs forward flow within a branch of the pulmonary artery, creating a static column of blood between the tip of the catheter and the j point in the pulmonary venous bed where it intersects with flowing blood. The Ppw tracing contains the same sequence of waves and descents as the Pra tracing. However, when referenced to the ECG, the waves and descents of the Ppw will be seen later than those of the Pra, because the pressure waves from the left atrium must travel back through the pulmonary vasculature and a longer length of catheter. Therefore, in the Ppw tracing, the a wave usually appears after the QRS complex, and the v wave is seen after the T wave.
screen-shot-2016-10-19-at-2-19-49-pmInterpretation of CVP and PAWP measurements

Correlation to the EKG

The easiest wave to evaluate an atrial tracing is to first locate the v wave. Generally, it will appear immeidately after the peak of T wave on a CVP waveform, however, it will be 80-120 ms after the T wave on a PAWP tracing. You can generally identify the v wave by ruling out other waves. It must be after the peak of the T wave. Once the v wave is identified, the a and c can be determined.

Observe the EKG rhythm. If the patient has a sinus rhythm, an a wave should be present. The a should be in the PR interval for a CVP. It is later in the PAWP, appearing within or even afte QRS. If the patient does not have a P wave, the a wave will be absent. If the P wave is not synchronized to the QRS, very large a wave may be present. These large a waves may appear as one very large wave during a cardiac cycle. The large a waves are called cannon a waves. They are actually exaggerated atrial pressures that occur when the atria contract against a closed AV valve, adding to the pressure that is already being generated due to the c or v wave.

If present, the c wave is generally within the QRS for a CVP. It will be after the QRS for a PAWP.

Where to Measure CVP and PAWP

At the very end of ventricular diastole, the atrial pressure equilibrates with the ventricular pressure, at the very end of ventricular filling. Measurement of the atrial pressure at the end of diastole provides the best opportunity to capture ventricular filling pressure. The location on the atrial pressure wave that best reflects end-diastolic pressure is the point just prior to the c wave. However, c wave is often absent or difficult to find, espeically true in the PAWP waveform, which is subject to considerable movement artifact from right ventricular systole and breathing. If we cannot use the mehtod based on c wave to measure the filling pressure, instead we can use other two ways to capture the filling pressure, where the second method for identification of the end-diastolic pressure is to take the mean of the highest and lowest a wave pressure; and the thrid method is used if the a wave is hard to interpret or absent, that is, the end-diastolic pressure can be estimated by identifying the Z point. Draw a line from the end of the QRS to the atrial tracing. The point where the line intersects with the waveform is the Z line. Note that for a PAWP waveform the Z line should be estimated as 0.08-0.12 seconds to the left of the end of the QRS (Z point is delayed 0.08-0.12 seconds from the QRS on the PAWP).


Respiratory Influences on Hemodynamic Data: Transmural Pressure

The Pra and Ppw are used as surrogates for RV and LV filling pressure (so the preload), but remember that when evaluating the patient's preload the end-diastolic volume of the ventricles should also be included in the interpretation. Here in this section we focus our discussion on the respiratory influecnes on the recorded hemodynamic data. OK, it is the transmural (intravascular minus pleural) pressure that represents the distending pressure for cardiac filling. During normal breathing, Ppl is slightly negative at end-expiration and intrathoracic vascular pressures measured at this point in respiratory cycle provide the best estimate of transmural pressure. Either a strip recording or the cursor method should be used to define the end-expiratory pressure.

One error is the assumption that during mechanical ventilation the lowest point in the pressure tracing reflects end expiration. While this is true during controlled ventilation, inspiratory efforts that trigger mechanical breaths produce a nadir in the pressure tracing. Identification of end expiration in the Ppw tracing is aided by the knowledge that expiration is usually longer than inspiration, two exceptions being marked tachypnea and inverse-ratio ventilation. Identification of end expiration from the pressure tracing should not be difficult when interpreted in relationship to the patient's ventilatory pattern. When confusion occurs, a simultaneous airway pressure tracing may be used.

The Pra and Ppw will overestimate transmural pressure if intrathoracic pressure is positive at end expiration. This can occur from an increase in end-expiratory lung volume due to applied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or auto-PEEP, or from increased intra-abdominal pressure due to active expiration or intra-abdominal hypertension.


Common Errors and Artifacts

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-7-58-42-pmMost errors in the collection and interpretation of hemodynamic data are listed in Table 2-2.

Probably the most commonly observed artifacts relate to an improper degree of damping. The over-damped tracing indicates the presence of excessive friction absorbing the force of the pressure wave somewhere in the line from the catheter tip to the transducer. The tracing lacks proper fidelity and appears smooth and rounded because of loss of frequency response. This will result in loss of data and will falsely lower peak pressures. Typically, the dicrotic notch on the aortic or pulmonary artery waveforms is absent, and the right atrial or PAPW waveforms will lack distinct a and v waves.

Under-damping causes overshoot or ring artifact. This artifact typically appears as one or more narrow "spikes" overshooting the true pressure during the systolic pressure rise with similar, negatively directed waves overshooting the true pressure contour during the downstroke. This artifact may lead to overestimation of the peak pressure and underestimation of the pressure nadir. Tiny air bubbles that oscillate rapidly back and forth, transmitting energy back to the transducer, cause this artifact. Flushing the catheter or transducer often corrects this artifact; alternatively, introduction of a filter to the hemodynamic system may be necessary to eliminate this artifact.

Related to overshoot or ring artifact is catheter whip or fling artifact. This artifact is created by acceleration of the fluid within the catheter from rapid catheter motion and is commonly seen with balloon-tipped catheters in hyperdynamic hearts or balloon-tipped catheters placed in the pulmonary artery with extraneous loops. Similar to ring artifact, catheter whip causes overestimation of the systolic pressure and underestimation of the diastolic pressure. This artifact is difficult to remedy; eliminating the extra loops or deflation of the balloon can improve the appearance and limit this artifact.

Catheter malposition creates several interesting artifacts.

Physiologic Adapations and Maladaptations in Heart Failure

October 20, 2015 Cardiology, Physiology and Pathophysiology No comments , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Basic Concepts

Preload

The concept of preload in the intact heart was described by physiologists Frank and Starling a century ago. The preload can be though of as the amount of myocardial stretch at the end of diastole, just before contraction. Measurements that correlate with myocardial stretch, and that are often used to indicate the preload on the horizontal axis, are the ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV).

Afterload

Afterload in the intact heart reflects the resistance that the ventricle must overcome to empty its contents. It is more formally defined as the ventricular wall stress that develops during systolic ejection. Wall stress (σ), like pressure, is expressed as force per unit area and, for the left ventricle, may be estimated from Laplace relationship:

σ = (P x r)/(2 x h)

where P is ventricular pressure, r is ventricular chamber radius, and h is ventricular wall thickness. Thus, ventricular wall stress rises in response to a higher pressure load (e.g., hypertension) or an increased chamber size (e.g., a dilated left ventricle). Conversely, as would be expected from Laplace relationship, an increase in wall thickness (h) serves a compensatory role in reducing wall stress, because the force is distributed over a greater mass per unit surface area of ventricular muscle.


Pathophysiology of Heart Failure

The pathophysiology of heart failure is complex and must be understood at multiple levels. Traditionally, research has focused on the hemodynamic changes of the failing heart, considering the heart as an isolated organ. However, studies of the failing heart have emphasized the importance of understanding changes at the cellular level and the neuro-hormonal interactions between the heart and other organs of the body.

Hemodynamic Changes

From a hemodynamic standpoint, heart failure can arise from worsening systolic or diastolic function or, more frequently, a combination of both.

Systolic Dysfunction

In systolic dysfunction, the isovolumic systolic pressure curve of the pressure-volume relationship is shifted downward (A). This reduce the stroke volume of the heart with a concomitant decrease in cardiac output. To maintain cardiac output, the heart can respond with three compensatory mechanisms:

1.Increased return of blood to the heart (preload) can lead to increased contraction of sarcomeres. In the pressure-volume relationship, the heart operates at a' instead of a, and stroke volume increases, but at the cost of increased end-diastolic pressure (D).

2.Second, increase release of catecholamines can increase cardiac output by both increasing the heart rate and shifting the systolic isovolumetric curve to the left (C).

3.Cardiac muscle can hypertrophy and ventricular volume can increase, which shifts the diastolic curve to the right (B).

Screen Shot 2015-10-18 at 7.15.43 PMAlthough each of these compensatory mechanisms can temporarily maintain cardiac output, each is limited in its ability to do so, and if the underlying reason for systolic dysfunction remains untreated, the heart ultimately fails.

Diastolic Dysfunction

Screen Shot 2015-10-18 at 8.49.51 PMIn diastolic dysfunction, the position of the systolic isovolumic curve remains unchanged (contractility of the myocytes is preserved). However, the diastolic pressure-volume curve is shift to the left, with an accompanying increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and symptoms of heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction can be present in any disease that causes decreased relaxation, decreased elastic recoil, or increased stiffness of the ventricle.

Neurohormonal Changes

After an injury to the heart, increased secretion of endogenous neurohormones and cytokines is observed. Initially, increased activity of the adrenergic system and the renin-angiotensin system provides a compensatory response that maintains perfusion of vital organs. However, over time these changes can lead to progressive deterioration of cardiac function.

Sympathetic Nervous System

Increased sympathetic activity occurs early in the development of heart failure. Elevated plasma norepinephrine levels cause increased cardiac contractility and an increased heart rate that initially help maintain cardiac output. However, continued increases lead to increased preload (as a result of venous vasoconstriction) and afterload (from arterial vasoconstriction), which can worsen heart failure. In addition, sympathetic hyperactivity causes deleterious cellular changes.

RAAS

Reduced renal blood pressure stimulates the release of renin and increases the production of angiotensin II. Both angiotensin II and sympathetic activation cause efferent glomerular arteriolar vasoconstriction, which helps maintain the glomerular filtration rate despite a reduced cardiac output. Angiotensin II stimulates aldosterone synthesis, which leads to sodium resorption and potassium excretion by the kidneys. However, a vicious circle is initiated as continued hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system leads to severe vasoconstriction, increased afterload, and further reduction in cardiac output and glomerular filtration rate.

ADH

Heart failure is associated with increases release of vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland. Vasopressin is another powerful vasoconstrictor that also promotes reabsorption of water in the renal tubules (collecting ducts).

Cytokines and Others

Heart failure is associated with the release of cytokines and other circulating peptides. Cytokines are a heterogeneous family of proteins that are secreted by macrophages, lymphocytes, monocytes, and endothelial cells in response to injury. The interleukins (ILs) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are the two major groups of cytokines that may have an important pathophysiologic role in heart failure. Upregulation of the gene responsible for TNF with an acompanying increase in circulating plasma levels of TNF has been found in patients with hear failure. TNF appears to have an important role in the cycle of myocyte hypertrophy and cell death (apoptosis). Preliminary in vitro data suggest that IL-1 may accelerate myoctye hypertrophy. Another peptide important for mediating some of the pathophysiologic effects observed in heart failure is the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin, which is released from endothelial cells. Preliminary data have suggested that excessive endothelin release may be responsible for hypertension in the pulmonary arteries observed in patients with left ventricular heart failure. Endothelin is also associated with myocyte growth and deposition of collagen in the interstitial matrix.

Cellular Changes

Pathophysiologic chanages at the cellular level are very complex and include changes in Ca2+ handling, adrenergic receptros, contractile apparatus, and myocyte structure.

Ca2+ Handling

In heart failure, both delivery of Ca2+ to the contractle apparatus and reuptake of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum are slowed. Decreased levels of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for the specialized Ca2+ release channels have been reported by some investigators. Similarly, myocytes from failing hearts have reduced levels of mRNA for the two sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins phospholamban and Ca2+-ATPase.

Changes of Adrenergic Receptors

Two major classes of adrengeric receptors are found in the human heart. Alpha1-adrenergic receptors are important for induction of myocardial hypertrophy; levels of alpha1 receptors are slightly increased in heart failure. Heart failure is associated with significant beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization as a result of chronic sympathetic activation. This effect is mediated by downregulation of beta1-adrenergic receptors, downstream uncoupling of the signal transducton pathway, and upregulation of inhibitory G proteins. All of these changes lead to a further reduction in myocyte contractility.

Contractile Apparatus

Cardiac myocytes cannot proliferate once they have matured to their adult form. However, these is a constant turnover of the contractile proteins that make up the sarcomere. In response to the hemodynamic stresss associated with heart failure, angiotensin II, TNF, norepinephrine, and other molecules induce protein synthesis via intranuclear mediators of gene activity. This causes myoctye hypertrophy with an increase in sarcomere numbers and a re-expression of tetal and neonatal forms of myosin and troponin. Activation of this primitive program results in the development of large myocytes that do not contract normally and have decreased ATPase activity.

Myocyte Structure Changes

The heart enarges in response to continued hemodynamic stress. Changes in myocardial size and shape associated with heart failure are collectively referred to as left ventricular remodeling. Several tissue is associated with myocyte loss via a process of necrosis, apoptosis (programmed cell death). Unlike the process of necrosis, apoptotic cells initially demonstrate decreased cell volume without disrutpion of the cell membrane. However, as the apoptotic process continues, the myocyte ultimately dies, and "holes" are left in the myocardium. Loss of myocytes places increased stress on the remaining myoctes. The process of apoptosis is accelerated by the proliferative signals that stimulate myocyte hypertrophy such as TNF. Although apoptosis is a normal process that is essential in organs made up of proliferating cells, in the heart apoptosis initiates a vicious circle whereby cell death causes increased stress that leads to hypertrophy and further acceleraton of apoptosis.

A second tissue change observed in heart failure is an increased amount of fibrous tissue in the interstitial spaces of the heart. Collagen deposition is due to activation of fibroblasts and myocyte death. Endothelin release leads to interstitial collagen deposition. The increase in connective tissue increase chamber siffness and shifts the diastolic pressure-volume curve to the left.

Finally, heart failure is associated with gradual dilation of the ventricle. Myocyte "slippage" as a result of activation of collagenases that disrupt the collagen network may be responsible for this process.