Skip to content

Category Archives: Hematology

Regulation of Hemostasis


Key events that initiate and propagate coagulation are the redistribution of negatively charged phospholipids to the cell surface and the exposure of tissue factor to the blood. The appropriate negatively charged phospholipids, primarily phosphatidylserine, can arise as a result of either cellular activation with strong agonists like thrombin together with collagen in the case of […]

Some Critical Notices Should Knowing When Using Warfarin


PT/INR and Anticoagulation Status For the vast majority of patients        , monitoring is done using the prothrombin time with international normalized ratio (PT/INR), which reflects the degree of anticoagulation due to depletion of vitamin K-dependent coagulation. However, attention must be paid that the PT/INR in a patient on warfarin may note reflect the total anticoagulation status […]

Overview of the Hemostasis System


Procoagulant Pathways Two procoagulant pathway have been identified which converge at the “intrinsic” (accessory) fXase (fIXa*fVIIIa) complex. The contact or “intrinsic” pathway is activated by the interaction of blood with a foreign surface. This pathway is activated by the factor XIIa-high-molecular-weight kininogen (HMWK)-prekallikrein complex in association with foreign surfaces including glass, dextran sulfate, or kaolin. […]

[Hemostasis] General – Diagnostic Approach to the Bleeding Disorders


Clinical Presentations and Clinical Distinction Between Platelet- or Vessel-Induced Bleeding and Coagulation-Induced Bleeding Certain signs and symptoms are virtually diagnostic of disordered hemostasis. They can be divided arbitrarily into two groups: those seen more often in disorders of blood coagulation and those most commonly noted in disorders of the vessels and platelets. The latter group […]

[Physiology][Hematology] General Concepts in Hemolytic Anemias


Hemolysis is the accelerated destruction of red blood cells (RBCs), leading to decreased RBC survival. The bone marrow's response to hemolysis is increased erythropoiesis, reflected by reticulocytosis. If the rate of hemolysis is modest and the bone marrow is able to completely compensate for the decreased RBC life span, the hemoglobin concentration may be normal; […]