Resistances In A Single Organ

In an organ, the consecutive vascular segments are arranged in series within an organ. Therefore, the overall vascular resistance of the organ must equal the sum of the resistances of its consecutive vascular segments,

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Because arterioles have a large vascular resistance in comparison to the other vascular segments (see above), the overall vascular resistance of any organ is determined to a very large extent by the resistance of its arterioles. And according to its histologic characteristics, we can change the diameter of arterioles either spontaneously or with will (i.e., arterioles inside the penis). Thus, the blood flow through an organ is primarily regulated by adjustments in the internal diameter of arterioles caused by contraction or relaxation of their muscular arteriolar walls.

When the arterioles of an organ change diameter, not only does the flow (in general flow is decreased) to the organ change but also the manner in which the pressures drop within the organ is also modified. Arteriolar constriction causes a greater pressure drop  across the arterioles, and this tends to increase the arterial pressure while it decreases the pressure in capillaries and veins. Conversely, increased organ blood flow caused by arteriolar dilation is accompanied by decreased arterial pressure and increased capillary pressure. Because of the changes in capillary hydrostatic pressure, arteriolar constriction tends to cause transcapillary fluid reabsorption, whereas arteriolar dilation tends to promote transcapillary fluid filtration (see thread Transcapillary Transport at http://www.tomhsiung.com/wordpress/2015/07/transcapillary-transport/).
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Resistances In A Whole Body

The overall resistance to flow through the entire systemic circulation is called the total peripheral resistance. Because the systemic organs are generally arranged in parallel, the vascular resistance of each organ contributes to the total peripheral resistance according to the following  parallel resistance equation:

Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 10.51.03 PMAccording to the parallel vascular model, the TPR must always be less than that of any of the elements in the network (organ1, organ2, …, organn).


Compliance of Vassels

As indicated earlier, arteries and veins contribute only a small portion to the overall resistance to flow through a vascular bed. Therefore, changes in their diameters have no significant effect on the blood flow through systemic organs. The elastic behavior of arteries and veins is however every important to overall cardiovascular function because they can act as reservoirs and substantial amounts of blood can be stored in them.

Arteries or veins behave more like balloons with one pressure throughout rather than as resistive pipes with a flow-related pressure difference from end to end. Thus, we often think of an “arterial compartment” and a “venous compartment,” each with an internal pressure that is related to the volume of blood within it at any instant and how elastic its walls are.

The elastic nature of a vascular region is characterized by a parameter called compliance that describes how much its volume changes (ΔV) in response to a given change in distending pressure (ΔP): C = ΔV/ΔP. Distending pressure is the difference between the internal and external pressures on the vascular walls. The volume-pressure curves for the systemic arterial and venous compartments are shown in Figure 6-8. It is immediately apparent from the disparate slopes of the curve in this figure that the elastic properties of arteries and veins are very different. For the arterial compartment, the ΔV/ΔP measured near a normal operating pressure of 100 mm Hg indicates a compliance of approximately 2 mL/mm Hg. By contrast, the venous pool has a compliance of more than 100 mL/mm Hg near its normal operating pressure of 5 to 10 mm Hg.

Besides, arterial compliance also decreases with increasing MAP. Otherwise, arterial compliance is a relatively stable parameter.
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Because veins are so compliant, even small changes in peripheral venous pressure can cause a significant amount of the circulation blood volume to shift into or out of the peripheral venous pool. Standing upright, for example, increases venous pressure in the lower extremities, distends the compliant veins, and promotes blood accumulation (pooling) in these vessels, as might be represented by as shift from point A to point B in Figure 6-8. Fortunately, this process can be counteracted by active venous constriction. The dashed line in Figure 6-8 shows the venous volume-pressure relationship that exists when veins are constricted by activation of venous smooth muscle. In constricted veins, volume may be normal (point C) or even below normal (point D) despite higher-than-normal venous pressure. Peripheral venous constriction tends to increase peripheral venous pressure and shift blood out of the peripheral venous compartment.


Mean Arterial Pressure

Mean arterial pressure is a critically important cardiovascular variable because it is the average effective pressure that drives blood through the systemic organs. One of the most fundamental equations of cardiovascular physiology is that which indicates how mean arterial pressure is related to cardiac output and total peripheral resistance:

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This equation is simply a rearrangement of the basic flow equation (Q = ΔP/R) applied to the entire systemic circulation with the single assumption that central venous pressure is approximately zero so that ΔP = MAP. Of note is that all changes in MAP result from changes in either cardiac output or total peripheral resistance.


Arterial Pulse Pressure

The arterial pulse pressure (PP) is defined simply as systolic pressure minus diastolic pressure,

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To be able to use pulse pressure to deduce something about how the cardiovascular system is operating, one must do more than just define it. It is important to understand what determines pulse pressure; that is, what causes it to be what it is and what can cause it to change. As a consequence of the compliance of the arterial vessels, arterial pressure increases as arterial blood volume is expanded during cardiac ejection. The magnitude of the pressure increase (ΔP) caused by an increase in arterial volume depends on how large the volume change (ΔV) is and on how compliant (CA) the arterial compartment is: ΔP = ΔV/CA. If, for the moment, the fact that some blood leaves the arterial compartment during cardiac eject is neglected, then the increase in arterial volume during each heartbeat is equal to the stroke volume (SV). Thus, pulse pressure is, to a first approximation, equal to stoke volume divided by arterial compliance:

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If the stoke volume of a normal resting young man is approximately 80 mL and the arterial compliance is approximately 2 mL/mm Hg, arterial pulse should be approximately 40 mm Hg, according to the equation above. Because the compliance of arteries decrease as age grows, the arterial pulse pressure increases as age grows. Of note, arterial blood volume and mean arterial pressure tend to increase with age. The increase in mean arterial pressure is not caused by the decreased arterial compliance because compliance changes do not directly influence either cardiac output or total peripheral resistance, which are the sole determinants of MAP. And, the decrease in arterial compliance is sufficient to cause increased pulse pressure even through stroke volume tends to decrease with age.

In addition, MAP tends to increase with age because of an age-dependent increase in total peripheral resistance, which is controlled primarily by arterioles, not arteries.

The preceding equation for pulse pressure is a much-simplified description of some very complex hemodynamic processes. It correctly identifies stroke volume and arterial compliance as the major determinants of arterial pulse pressure but is based on the assumption that no blood leaves the aorta during systolic ejection. Obviously, this is not strictly correct. It is therefore not surprising that several factors other than arterial compliance and stroke volume have minor influences on pulse pressure. For example, because the arteries have viscous properties as well as elastic characteristics, faster cardiac ejection caused by increased myocardial contractility tends to increase pulse pressure somewhat even if stroke volume remains constant. Changes in peripheral resistance, however, have little or no effect on pulse pressure, because a change in total peripheral resistance causes parallel change in both systolic and diastolic pressures.